Category Archives: History of Mathematics

All at sea

As I’ve said more than once in the past, mathematics as a discipline as we know it today didn’t exist in the Early Modern Period. Mathematics, astronomy, astrology, geography, cartography, navigation, hydrography, surveying, instrument design and construction, and horology were all facets or sub-disciplines of a sort of mega-discipline that was the stomping ground of the working mathematicus, whether inside or outside the university. The making of sea charts – or to give it its technical name, hydrography – combines mathematics, geography, cartography, astronomy, surveying, and the use of instruments so I am always happy to add a new volume on the history of sea charts to my collection of books on cartography and hydrography.

I recently acquired the “revised and updated” reissue of Peter Whitfield’s Charting the Oceans, a British Library publication.

The original edition from 1996 carried the subtitle Ten Centuries of Maritime Maps (missing from the new edition) and this is what Whitfield delivers in his superb tome. The book has four sections: Navigation before Charts, The Sea-Chart and the Age of Exploration, Sea-Charts in Europe’s Maritime Age and War, Empire and Technology: The Last 200 years. As can be seen from these section titles Whitfield not only deals with the details of the hydrography and the charts produced but defines the driving forces behind the cartographic developments: explorations, trade, war and colonisation. This makes the book to a valuable all round introduction of the subject highly recommended to anybody looking for a general overview of the topic.

However, what really makes this book very special is the illustrations.

The Nile Delta, c. 1540, from Piri Re’is Kitab-i Bahriye
Charting the Oceans page 90

A large format volume, more than fifty per cent of the pages are adorned with amazing reproductions of the historical charts that Whitfield describes in his text.

Willem van de Velde II, Dutch Ships in a Calm, c. 1665
Charting the Oceans page 132

Beautifully photographed and expertly printed the illustrations make this a book to treasure. Although not an academic text, in the strict sense, there is a short bibliography for those, whose appetites wetted, wish to delve deeper into the subject and an excellent index. Given the quality of the presentation the official British Library shop price of £14.99 is ridiculously low and a real bargain. If you love maps all I can say is buy this book.

Title page to the English edition of Lucas Janszoon Waghenaer’s Spiegheel der Zeevaert, 1588
Charting the Oceans page 109

The A Very Short Introduction series of books published by the Oxford University Press is a really excellent undertaking. Very small format 11×17 and a bit cm, they are somewhere between 100 and 150 pages long and provide a concise introduction to a single topic. One thing that distinguishes them is the quality of the authors that OUP commissions to write them; they really are experts in their field. The Galileo volume, for example, is authored by Stillman Drake, one of the great Galileo experts, and The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction was written by Mr Periodic Table himself, Eric Scerri. So when Navigation: A Very Short Introduction appeared recently I couldn’t resist. Especially, as it is authored by Jim Bennett a man who probably knows more about the topic then almost anybody else on the surface of the planet.

Mr Bennett does not disappoint, in a scant 135-small-format-pages he delivers a very comprehensive introduction to the history of navigation. He carefully explains all of the principal developments down the centuries and does not shy away from explaining the intricate mathematical and astronomical details of various forms of navigation.

Navigation: A Very Short Introduction page 50

The book contains a very useful seven page Glossary of Terms, a short but very useful annotated bibliography, which includes the first edition of Whitfield’s excellent tome, and a comprehensive index. One aspect of the annotated bibliography that particularly appealed to me was his comments on Dava Sobel’s Longitude; he writes:

“[It] …has the disadvantage of being very one-sided despite the more scrupulous work found in in earlier books such as Rupert T. Gould, The Marine Chronometer: Its History and Development (London, Holland Press, 1960); and Humphrey Quill, John Harrison: The Man Who Found Longitude (London, John Baker, 1966)”

I have read both of these books earlier and can warmly recommend them. He then recommends Derek Howse, Greenwich Time and the Discovery of Longitude (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1980), which sits on my bookshelf, and Derek Howse, Nevil Maskelyne: The Seaman’s Astronomer, (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1989), which I haven’t read. However it was his closing comment that I found most interesting:

“A welcome recent corrective is Richard Dunn and Rebekah Higgitt, Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude (Collins: Glasgow, 2014)”. A judgement with which, regular readers of this blog will already know, I heartily concur.

The flyleaf of the Navigation volume contains the following quote:

‘a thoroughly good idea. Snappy, small-format…stylish design…perfect to pop into your pocket for spare moments’ – Lisa Jardine, The Times

Another judgement with which I heartily concur. Although square centimetre for square centimetre considerably more expensive than Whitfield’s book the Bennett navigation volume is still cheap enough (official OUP price £7.99) not to break the household budget. For those wishing to learn more about the history of navigation and the closely related mapping of the seas I can only recommend that they acquire both of these excellent publications.

 

 

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Filed under History of Cartography, History of Mathematics, History of Navigation

Did Eratosthenes really measure the size of the earth?

Last Thursday was Summer Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and The Guardian chose to mark the occasion with an article by astrophysicist turned journalist and novelist, Stuart Clark, who chose to regale his readers with a bit of history of science. The big question was would he get it right? He has form for not doing so and in fact, he succeeded in living up to that form. His article entitled Summer solstice: the perfect day to bask in a dazzling scientific feat, recounted the well know history of geodesy tale of how Eratosthenes used the summer solstice to determine the size of the earth.

Eratosthenes of Cyrene was the chief librarian at the great library of Alexandria in the third century BC. So the story goes, he read in one of the library’s many manuscripts an account of the sun being directly overhead on the summer solstice as seen from Syene (now Aswan, Egypt). This was known because the shadows disappeared at noon, when the sun was directly overhead. This sparked his curiosity and he set out to make the same observation in Alexandria. On the next solstice, he watched as the shadows grew small – but did not disappear, even at noon.

The length of the shadows in Alexandria indicated that the sun was seven degrees away from being directly overhead. Eratosthenes realised that the only way for the shadow to disappear at Syene but not at Alexandria was if the Earth’s surface was curved. Since a full circle contains 360 degrees, it meant that Syene and Alexandria were roughly one fiftieth of the Earth’s circumference away from each other.

Knowing that Syene is roughly 5000 stadia away from Alexandria, Eratosthenes calculated that the circumference of the Earth was about 250,000 stadia. In modern distance measurements, that’s about 44,000km – which is remarkably close to today’s measurement of 40,075km.

Eratosthenes also calculated that the tilt of the Earth’s polar axis (23.5 degrees) is why we have the solstice in the first place.

Illustration showing a portion of the globe showing a part of the African continent. The sunbeams shown as two rays hitting the ground at Syene and Alexandria. Angle of sunbeam and the gnomons (vertical pole) is shown at Alexandria, which allowed Eratosthenes’ estimates of radius and circumference of Earth.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Whilst it is correct that Eratosthenes was chief librarian of the Alexandrian library one should be aware that the Mouseion (Shrine of the Muses, the origin of the modern word, museum), which housed the library was more akin to a modern academic research institute than what one envisages under the word library. Eratosthenes was according to the legends a polymath, astronomer, cartographer, geographer, mathematician, poet and music theorist.

From the information that during the summer solstice the sun was directly overhead in Syene at noon, and cast no shadows and that a gnomon in Alexandria 5000 stadia north of Syene did cast a shadow, Eratosthenes did not, and I repeat did not, realise that the Earth’s surface was curved. Eratosthenes knew that the Earth’s surface was curved, as did every educated Greek scholar in the third century BCE. Sometimes I get tired of repeating this but the first to realise that the Earth was a sphere were the Pythagoreans in the sixth century BCE. Aristotle had summarised the empirical evidence that showed that the Earth is a sphere in the fourth century BCE, in writings that Eratosthenes, as chief librarian in Alexandria, would have been well acquainted with. Put simply, Eratosthenes knew that he could, using trigonometry, calculate the diameter of the Earth’s sphere with the data he had accumulated, because he already knew that it was a sphere.

The next problem with the account given here is one that almost always turns up in popular version of the Eratosthenes story; there wasn’t just one measure of length in the ancient Greek world known as a stadium but quite a collection of different ones, all differing in length, and we have absolutely no idea which one is meant here. It is in the end not so important as all of them give a final figure with 17% or less error compared to the true value, which is for the method used quite a reasonable ball park figure for the size of the Earth. However this point is one that should be mentioned when recounting the Eratosthenes story. Eratosthenes may or may not have calculated the tilt of the Earth’s axis but this is of no real historical significance, as the obliquity of the ecliptic, as it is also known, was, like the spherical shape of the Earth, known well before his times.

An astute reader might have noticed that above I used the expression, according to the legends, when describing Eratosthenes’ supposed talents. The problem is that everything we know about Eratosthenes is hearsay. None of his alleged many writings have survived. We only have second hand reports of his supposed achievements, most of them centuries after he lived. This raises the question, how reliable are these reports? A comparable situation is the so-called theorem of Pythagoras, well known to other cultures well before Pythagoras lived and only attributed to him long after he had died.

The most extreme stance is elucidated by historian of astronomy, John North, in his one volume history of astronomy, Cosmos:

None of Eratosthenes’ writings survive, however, and some have questioned whether he ever found either the circumference of the Earth, or – as is often stated – the obliquity of the ecliptic, on the basis of measurements.

So what is our source for this story? The only account of Eratosthenes’ measurement comes from the book On the Circular Motions of the Celestial Bodies by the Greek astronomer Cleomedes and with that the next problems start. It is not actually known when Cleomodes lived. On the basis of his writings Thomas Heath, the historian of Greek mathematics, thought that text was written in the middle of the first century BCE. However, Otto Neugebauer, historian of ancient science, thought that On the Circular Motions of the Celestial Bodies was written around 370 CE. Amongst historians of science the debate rumbles on. North favours the Neugebauer date, placing the account six centuries after Eratosthenes’ death. What exactly did Cleomodes say?

The method of Eratosthenes depends on a geometrical argument and gives the impression of being slightly more difficult to follow. But his statement will be made clear if we premise the following. Let us suppose, in this case too, first, that Syene and Alexandria he under the same meridian circle, secondly, that the distance between the two cities is 5,000 stades; 1 and thirdly, that the rays sent down from different parts of the sun on different parts of the earth are parallel; for this is the hypothesis on which geometers proceed Fourthly, let us assume that, as proved by the geometers, straight lines falling on parallel straight lines make the alternate angles equal, and fifthly, that the arcs standing on (i e., subtended by) equal angles are similar, that is, have the same proportion and the same ratio to their proper circles—this, too, being a fact proved by the geometers. Whenever, therefore, arcs of circles stand on equal angles, if any one of these is (say) one-tenth of its proper circle, all the other arcs will be tenth parts of their proper circles.

Any one who has grasped these facts will have no difficulty in understanding the method of Eratosthenes, which is this Syene and Alexandria lie, he says, under the same mendian circle. Since meridian circles are great circles in the universe, the circles of the earth which lie under them are necessarily also great circles. Thus, of whatever size this method shows the circle on the earth passing through Syene and Alexandria to be, this will be the size of the great circle of the earth Now Eratosthenes asserts, and it is the fact, that Syene lies under the summer tropic. Whenever, therefore, the sun, beingin the Crab at the summer solstice, is exactly in the middle of the heaven, the gnomons (pointers) of sundials necessarily throw no shadows, the position of the sun above them being exactly vertical; and it is said that this is true throughout a space three hundred stades in diameter. But in Alexandria, at the same hour, the pointers of sundials throw shadows, because Alexandria lies further to the north than Syene. The two cities lying under the same meridian great circle, if we draw an arc from the extremity of the shadow to the base of the pointer of the sundial in Alexandria, the arc will be a segment of a great circle in the (hemispherical) bowl of the sundial, since the bowl of the sundial lies under the great circle (of the meridian). If now we conceive straight lines produced from each of the pointers through the earth, they will meet at the centre of the earth. Since then the sundial at Syene is vertically under the sun, if we conceive a straight line coming from the sun to the top of the pointer of the sundial, the line reaching from the sun to the centre of the earth will be one straight line. If now we conceive another straight line drawn upwards from the extremity of the shadow of the pointer of the sundial in Alexandria, through the top of the pointer to the sun, this straight line and the aforesaid straight line will be parallel, since they are straight lines coming through from different parts of the sun to different parts of the earth. On these straight lines, therefore, which are parallel, there falls the straight line drawn from the centre of the earth to the pointer at Alexandria, so that the alternate angles which it makes arc equal. One of these angles is that formed at the centre of the earth, at the intersection of the straight lines which were drawn from the sundials to the centre of the earth; the other is at the point of intersection of the top of the pointer at Alexandria and the straight line drawn from the extremity of its shadow to the sun through the point (the top) where it meets the pointer. Now on this latter angle stands the arc carried round from the extremity of the shadow of the pointer to its base, while on the angle at the centre of the earth stands the arc reaching from Syene to Alexandria. But the arcs are similar, since they stand on equal angles. Whatever ratio, therefore, the arc in the bowl of the sundial has to its proper circle, the arc reaching from Syene to Alexandria has that ratio to its proper circle. But the arc in the bowl is found to be one-fiftieth of its proper circle.’ Therefore the distance from Syene to Alexandria must necessarily be one-fiftieth part of the great circle of the earth. And the said distance is 5,000 stades; therefore the complete great circle measures 250,000 stades. Such is Eratosthenes’ method. (This is Thomas Heath’s translation) 

You will note that Cleomedes makes no mention of Eratosthenes determining the spherical shape of the Earth through his observations but writes very clearly of great circles on the globe, an assumption of spherical form. So where does Stuart Clark get this part of his story? In his article he tells us his source:

I first heard the story when it was told by Carl Sagan in his masterpiece TV series, Cosmos.

The article has a video of the relevant section of Sagan’s Cosmos and he does indeed devote a large part of his version of the story to explaining how Eratosthenes used his observations to determine that the Earth is curved. In other words Stuart Clark is just repeating verbatim a story, which Carl Sagan, and or his scriptwriters, made up in 1980 without taken the trouble to verify the accuracies or even the truth of what he saw more than thirty years ago. Carl Sagan said it, so it must be true. I have got into trouble on numerous occasions by pointing out to Carl Sagan acolytes that whatever his talents as a science communicator/populariser, his history of science was to put it mildly totally crap. Every week he pumped his souped-up versions of crappy history of science myths into millions of homes throughout the world. In one sense it is only right that Neil deGasse Tyson presented the modern remake of Cosmos, as he does exactly the same.

 

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Filed under History of Astronomy, History of Mathematics, Myths of Science

Measure for measure

The Brexit vote in the UK has produced a bizarre collection of desires of those Leavers eager to escape the poisonous grasp of the Brussels’ bureaucrats. At the top of their list is a return of the death penalty, a piece of errant stupidity that I shall leave largely uncommented here. Not far behind is the wish to abandon the metric system and to return to selling fruit and vegetables in pounds and ounces. This is particularly strange for a number of reasons. Firstly the UK went metric in 1965, six years before it joined the EU. Secondly EU regulations actually allows countries to use other systems of weights and measures parallel to the metric system, so there is nothing in EU law stopping greengrocers selling you a pound of carrots or bananas. Thirdly the country having gone metric in 1965, anybody in the UK under the age of about fifty is going to have a very hard time knowing what exactly pounds and ounces are.

Most readers of this blog will have now gathered that I have spent more than half my life living in Germany. Germany is of course one of the founding states of the EU and as such has been part of it from the very beginning in 1957. The various states that now constitute Germany also went metric at various points in the nineteenth century, the earliest in 1806-15, and the latest in 1868. However the Germans are a very pragmatic folk and I can and do buy my vegetables on the market place in Erlangen in pounds and half pounds. The Germans like most Europeans used variation of the predecessors to the so-called Imperial system of weights and measures and simple re-designated the pound (Pfund in German) to be half a kilo. The Imperial pound is actually approximately 454 grams and for practical purposes when buying potatoes or apples the 46-gram difference if negligible. Apparently the British are either too stupid or too inflexible to adopt such a pragmatic solution.

At the beginning of the month Tory dingbat and wanna be journalist Simon Heffer wrote an article in The Telegraph with the glorious title, Now that we are to be a sovereign nation again, we must bring back imperial units. I haven’t actually read it because one has to register in order to do so and I would rather drink bleach than register with the Torygraph. I shall also not link to the offending article, as it will only encourage them. Heffer charges into the fray thus:

But I know from my postbag that there is another infliction from the decades of our EU membership that many would like to be shot of, and that was the imposition of the metric system on large parts of our life. 

Consumer resistance ensured that our beer is still served in pints (though not in half-pint and pint bottles when bought in supermarkets: brewers please note), and that our signposts are still marked in miles.

As pointed out above it was not the EU who imposed the metric system on British lives but the British government before the UK joined the EU. According to EU regulations you can serve drinks in any quantities you like just as long as the glasses are calibrated, so keeping the traditional pint glasses and mugs in British pubs was never a problem. Alcohol is sold in Germany in a bewildering range of different size glasses depending on the local traditions. My beer drinking German friends (the Germans invented the stuff, you know) particularly like pints of beer because they say that they contain a mouthful more beer that a half litre glass. Sadly many bars in Franconia have gone over to selling beer in 0.4litre glasses to increase their profits, but I digress.

UK signposts are still marked in miles because the government could not afford the cost of replacing all of them when the UK went metric. Expediency not national pride was the motivation here.

Just before Heffer’s diatribe disappears behind the registration wall he spouts the following:

But we have been forced on to the Celsius temperature scale, which is less precise than Fahrenheit

When I read this statement I went back to check if the article had been published on 1 April, it hadn’t! Is the international scientific community aware of the fact that they have been conned into using an inaccurate temperature scale? (I know that scientist actually use the Kelvin temperature scale but it’s the same as the Celsius scale with a different zero point, so I assume by Heffer’s logic(!) it suffers from the same inaccuracy). Will all of those zillions of experiments and research programmes carried out using the Celsius/Kelvin scale have to be repeated with the accurate Fahrenheit scale? Does Simon Heffer actually get paid for writing this crap?

Anders_Celsius

Anders Celcius Portrait by Olof Arenius Source: Wikimedia Commons

Daniel-Gabriel-Fahrenheit

Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit

Like myself on being confronted with the bring back imperial weights and measures madness lots of commentators pointed out that the UK went metric in 1965 but is this true? No, it isn’t! The UK actually went metric, by act of parliament over one hundred years earlier in 1864! The nineteenth century contains some pretty stirring history concerning the struggles between the metric and imperial systems and we will now take a brief look at them.

As soon as it became in someway necessary for humans to measure things in their environment it was fairly obvious that they would use parts of their body to do so. If we want a quick approximate measure of something we still pace it out or measure it with the length of an arm or the span of our fingers. So it was natural that parts of the body became the units of measurement, the foot, the forearm, the arm span and so on and so forth. This system of course suffers from the fact that we are not all the same size. My foot is shorter than yours; my forearm is longer than my partners. This led cultures with a strong central bureaucracy to develop standard feet and forearms. The various Fertile Crescent cultures developed sophisticated weights and measures systems, as did the Roman Empire and it is the latter that is the forefather of the imperial system. The Roman foot was between 29.5 and 30 cm, the pace was 2.5 feet and the Roman mile was 5000 feet. The word mile comes from the Latin for thousand, mille. The Roman military, which was very standardised, carried the Roman system of weights and measures to large parts of Europe thus establishing their standards overall.

With the collapse of the Roman Empire their standardised system of weights and measures slowly degenerated and whilst the names were retained their dimensions varied from district to district and from town to town. In the eighth and ninth centuries Karl der Große (that’s Charlemagne for the Brits) succeeded in uniting a substantial part of Europe under his rule. Although he was uneducated and illiterate he was a strong supporter of education and what passed at the time for science and amongst his reforms he introduced a unified system of weights and measures for his entire empire, another forefather of the imperial system. Things are looking quite grim for the anti-European supporters of the imperial system; it was born in Rome the birthplace of the EU and was reborn at the hands of a German, nothing very British here.

Karl’s attempt to impose a unified system of weights and measures on his empire was not a great success and soon after his death each district and town went back to their own local standards, if they ever left them. Throughout the Middle Ages and deep into the Early Modern Period traders had to live with the fact that a foot in Liège was not the same as a foot in Venice and a pound in Copenhagen was not a pound in Vienna.

This chaos provided work for the reckoning masters producing tables of conversions or actually doing the conversions for the traders, as well as running reckoning schools for the apprentice traders where they taught the arithmetic and algebra necessary to do the conversions, writing the textbooks for the tuition as well. The lack of unity in currency and mensuration in medieval Europe was a major driving force in the development algebra – the rule of three ruled supreme.

At the beginning of the seventeenth century Simon Stevin and Christoph Clavius introduced decimal fractions and the decimal point into European mathematics, necessary requirements for a decimal based metric system of mensuration. Already in the middle of the seventeenth century just such a system emerged and not from the dastardly French but from a true blue English man, who was an Anglican bishop to boot, polymath, science supporter, communicator, founding member of the Royal Society and one of its first secretaries, John Wilkins (1614–1672).

Greenhill, John, c.1649-1676; John Wilkins (1614-1672), Warden (1648-1659)

Greenhill, John; John Wilkins (1614-1672), Warden (1648-1659); Wadham College, University of Oxford;

Asked by the society to devise a universal standard of measure he devoted four pages of his monumental An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language (1668) to the subject.

800px-Wilkins_An_Essay_towards_a_real

Title Page Source: Wikimedia Commons

He proposed a decimal system of measure based on a universal measure derived from nature for use between ‘learned men’ of various nations. He considered atmospheric pressure, the earth’s meridian and the pendulum as his universal measure, rejecting the first as susceptible to variation, the second as immeasurable and settled on the length of the second pendulum as his measure of length. Volume should be the cubic of length and weight a cubic standard of water. To all extents and purposes he proposed the metric system. His proposal fell, however, on deaf ears.

lengths001

European units of length in the first third of the 19th century Part 1

lengths002

European units of length in the first third of the 19th century Part 2

As science developed throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth century it became obvious that some sort of universal system of measurement was a necessity and various people in various countries addressed to subject. In 1790 the revolutionary Assemblée in France commissioned the Académie to investigate the topic. A committee consisting of Jean-Charles de Borda, Joseph-Louis Lagrange, Pierre-Simon Laplace, Gaspard Monge and Nicolas de Condorcet, all leading scientific figures, recommended the adoption of a decimal metric system based on one ten-millionth of one quarter of the Earth’s circumference. The proposal was accepted by the Assemblée on 30 March 1791. Actually determining the length of one quarter of the Earth circumference turned into a major project fraught with difficulties, which I can’t do justice to here in an already overlong blog post, but if you are interested then read Ken Adler’s excellent The Measure of All Things: The Seven-Year Odyssey That Transformed The World.

1920px-Metre_étalon,_place_Vendôme,_Paris_2008

Standard meter on the left of the entrance of the french Ministère de la Justice, Paris, France. Source: Wikimedia Commons

However Britain needed a unified system of mensuration, as they still had the problem that every town had different local standards for foot, pound etc. John Herschel the rising leading scientific figure wanted a new decimal imperial system based on the second pendulum but in the end parliament decide to stick with the old imperial system taking a physical yard housed in the Houses of Parliament as the standard for the whole of the UK. Unfortunately disaster struck. The Houses of Parliament burnt down in 1834 and with it the official standard yard. It took the scientists several years to re-establish the length of the official yard and meanwhile a large number were still advocating for the adoption of the metric system.

Britanski_merki_za_dalzhina_Grinuich_2005

The informal public imperial measurement standards erected at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London, in the 19th century: 1 British yard, 2 feet, 1 foot, 6 inches, and 3 inches. The inexact monument was designed to permit rods of the correct measure to fit snugly into its pins at an ambient temperature of 62 °F (16.66 °C) Source: Wikimedia Commons

The debate now took a scurrile turn with the introduction of pyramidology! An English writer, John Taylor, developed the thesis that the Great Pyramid was constructed using the imperial system and that the imperial system was somehow divine. Strangely his ideas were adopted and championed by Charles Piazzi Smyth the Astronomer Royal of Scotland and even received tacit and indirect support from John Herschel, who rejected the pyramidology aspect but saw Taylor’s pyramid inch as the natural standard of length.

However wiser heads prevailed and the leaders of the British Victorian scientific community made major contributions to the expansion of the metric system towards the SI system, used internationally by scientists today. They applied political pressure and in 1864 the politicians capitulated and parliament passed the Metric (Weights and Measures) Act. This permitted the use of weights and measures in Britain. Further acts followed in 1867, 1868, 1871 and 1873 extending the permitted use of the metre. However the metric system could be used for scientific purposes but not for business. For that, Britain would have to wait another one hundred and one years!

Interestingly, parallel to the discussion about systems of mensuration in the nineteenth century, a discussing took place about the adoption of a single prime meridian for cartographical, navigational, and time purposes. In the end the two main contenders were the observatories in Paris and Greenwich. Naturally neither Britain nor France was prepared to concede to the other. To try and solve the stalemate it was suggested that in exchange for Paris accepting Greenwich as the prime meridian London should adopt the metric system of measurement. By the end of the nineteenth century both countries had nominally agreed to the deal without a formal commitment. Although France fulfilled their half of this deal sometime early in the twentieth century, Britain took until 1965 before they fulfilled their half.

Should the Leavers get their wish and the UK returns to the imperial system of measurement then they will be joining an elite group consisting of the USA, Myanmar and Liberia, the only countries in the world that don’t have the metric system as their national system of measurement for all purposes.

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Filed under History of Mathematics, History of Navigation, History of science, Uncategorized

Why Mathematicus?

“The Renaissance Mathematiwot?”

“Mathematicus, it’s the Latin root of the word mathematician.”

“Then why can’t you just write The Renaissance Mathematician instead of showing off and confusing people?”

“Because a mathematicus is not the same as a mathematician.”

“But you just said…”

“Words evolve over time and change their meanings, what we now understand as the occupational profile of a mathematician has some things in common with the occupational profile of a Renaissance mathematicus but an awful lot more that isn’t. I will attempt to explain.”

The word mathematician actually has its origins in the Greek word mathema, which literally meant ‘that which is learnt’, and came to mean knowledge in general or more specifically scientific knowledge or mathematical knowledge. In the Hellenistic period, when Latin became the lingua franca, so to speak, the knowledge most associated with the word mathematica was astrological knowledge. In fact the terms for the professors[1] of such knowledge, mathematicus and astrologus, were synonymous. This led to the famous historical error that St. Augustine rejected mathematics, whereas his notorious attack on the mathematici[2] was launched not against mathematicians, as we understand the term, but against astrologers.

The earliest known portrait of Saint Augustine in a 6th-century fresco, Lateran, Rome Source: Wikimedia Commons

The earliest known portrait of Saint Augustine in a 6th-century fresco, Lateran, Rome
Source: Wikimedia Commons

However St. Augustine lived in North Africa in the fourth century CE and we are concerned with the European Renaissance, which, for the purposes of this post we will define as being from roughly 1400 to 1650 CE.

The Renaissance was a period of strong revival for Greek astrology and the two hundred and fifty years that I have bracketed have been called the golden age of astrology and the principle occupation of our mathematicus is still very much the casting and interpretation of horoscopes. Mathematics had played a very minor role at the medieval universities but the Renaissance humanist universities of Northern Italy and Krakow in Poland introduced dedicated chairs for mathematics in the early fifteenth century, which were in fact chairs for astrology, whose occupants were expected to teach astrology to the medical students for their astro-medicine or as it was known iatro-mathematics. All Renaissance professors of mathematics down to and including Galileo were expected to and did teach astrology.

A Renaissance Horoscope Kepler's Horoskop für Wallenstein Source: Wikimedia Commons

A Renaissance Horoscope
Kepler’s Horoskop für Wallenstein
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Of course, to teach astrology they also had to practice and teach astronomy, which in turn required the basics of mathematics – arithmetic, geometry and trigonometry – which is what our mathematicus has in common with the modern mathematician. Throughout this period the terms Astrologus, astronomus and mathematicus – astrologer, astronomer and mathematician ­– were synonymous.

A Renaissance mathematicus was not just required to be an astronomer but to quantify and describe the entire cosmos making him a cosmographer i.e. a geographer and cartographer as well as astronomer. A Renaissance geographer/cartographer also covered much that we would now consider to be history, rather than geography.

The Renaissance mathematicus was also in general expected to produce the tools of his trade meaning conceiving, designing and manufacturing or having manufactured the mathematical instruments needed for astronomer, surveying and cartography. Many were not just cartographers but also globe makers.

Many Renaissance mathematici earned their living outside of the universities. Most of these worked at courts both secular and clerical. Here once again their primary function was usually court astrologer but they were expected to fulfil any functions considered to fall within the scope of the mathematical science much of which we would see as assignments for architects and/or engineers rather than mathematicians. Like their university colleagues they were also instrument makers a principle function being horologist, i.e. clock maker, which mostly meant the design and construction of sundials.

If we pull all of this together our Renaissance mathematicus is an astrologer, astronomer, mathematician, geographer, cartographer, surveyor, architect, engineer, instrument designer and maker, and globe maker. This long list of functions with its strong emphasis on practical applications of knowledge means that it is common historical practice to refer to Renaissance mathematici as mathematical practitioners rather than mathematicians.

This very wide range of functions fulfilled by a Renaissance mathematicus leads to a common historiographical problem in the history of Renaissance mathematics, which I will explain with reference to one of my favourite Renaissance mathematici, Johannes Schöner.

Joan Schonerus Mathematicus Source: Wikimedia Commons

Joan Schonerus Mathematicus
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Schöner who was a school professor of mathematics for twenty years was an astrologer, astronomer, geographer, cartographer, instrument maker, globe maker, textbook author, and mathematical editor and like many other mathematici such as Peter Apian, Gemma Frisius, Oronce Fine and Gerard Mercator, he regarded all of his activities as different aspects or facets of one single discipline, mathematica. From the modern standpoint almost all of activities represent a separate discipline each of which has its own discipline historians, this means that our historical picture of Schöner is a very fragmented one.

Because he produced no original mathematics historians of mathematics tend to ignore him and although they should really be looking at how the discipline evolved in this period, many just spring over it. Historians of astronomy treat him as a minor figure, whilst ignoring his astrology although it was this that played the major role in his relationship to Rheticus and thus to the publication of Copernicus’ De revolutionibus. For historians of astrology, Schöner is a major figure in Renaissance astrology although a major study of his role and influence in the discipline still has to be written. Historians of geography tend to leave him to the historians of cartography, these whilst using the maps on his globes for their studies ignore his role in the history of globe making whilst doing so. For the historians of globe making, and yes it really is a separate discipline, Schöner is a central and highly significant figure as the founder of the long tradition of printed globe pairs but they don’t tend to look outside of their own discipline to see how his globe making fits together with his other activities. I’m still looking for a serious study of his activities as an instrument maker. There is also, as far as I know no real comprehensive study of his role as textbook author and editor, areas that tend to be the neglected stepchildren of the histories of science and technology. What is glaringly missing is a historiographical approach that treats the work of Schöner or of the Renaissance mathematici as an integrated coherent whole.

Western hemisphere of the Schöner globe from 1520. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Western hemisphere of the Schöner globe from 1520.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The world of this blog is at its core the world of the Renaissance mathematici and thus we are the Renaissance Mathematicus and not the Renaissance Mathematician.

[1] That is professor in its original meaning donated somebody who claims to possessing a particular area of knowledge.

[2] Augustinus De Genesi ad Litteram,

Quapropter bono christiano, sive mathematici, sive quilibet impie divinantium, maxime dicentes vera, cavendi sunt, ne consortio daemoniorum animam deceptam, pacto quodam societatis irretiant. II, xvii, 37

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Filed under History of Astrology, History of Astronomy, History of Cartography, History of Mathematics, History of science, History of Technology, Renaissance Science

Two views of the celestial spheres

When the Bishop of Salisbury scanned the heavens in the 1670s it was difficult to know if he was contemplating the wonders of his God, or those of Kepler’s planetary laws. Seth Ward, the incumbent of the Salisbury bishopric, was both a successful Anglican churchman and an acknowledge astronomer, who did much to boost Kepler’s theories in the middle of the seventeenth century.

Greenhill, John; Seth Ward (1617-1689), Savilian Professor of Astronomy, Oxford (1649-1660) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Greenhill, John; Seth Ward (1617-1689), Savilian Professor of Astronomy, Oxford (1649-1660)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Born in Aspenden in Hertfordshire on an unknown day in 1617, Seth Ward was the son of John Ward, an attorney, and his wife Mary Dalton. Having received a basic schooling he was admitted to Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge on 1 December 1632, where he graduated B.A. in 1637 and M.A. on 27 July 1640, following which he was elected a fellow of the college. Ward was a keen mathematician, who, like many others in the Early Modern Period, was largely self-taught, studying William Oughtred’s Clavis Mathematicae together with fellow maths enthusiast Charles Scarburgh, a future physician to Charles II. Finding some passages difficult the two of them travelled to Albury in Surrey where Oughtred was rector. Here they took instruction from Oughtred and it was the start of a relationship between Ward and Oughtred that lasted until Oughtred’s death in 1660.

Sir Charles Scarborough Jean Demetrius (attributed to) Royal College of Physicians, London Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sir Charles Scarborough Jean Demetrius (attributed to)
Royal College of Physicians, London
Source: Wikimedia Commons

In 1643 Ward was appointed lecture for mathematics for the university but he did not exercise this post for very long. Some of the Cambridge colleges, and in particular Sidney-Sussex, Cromwell’s alma mater, became centres for the Puritan uprising and in 1644 Seth Ward, a devote Anglican, was expelled from his fellowship for refusing to sign the covenant. At first he took refuge with friends in and around London but then he went back to Albury where he received tuition in mathematics from Oughtred for several months. Afterwards he became private tutor in mathematics to the children of a friend, where he remained until 1649. Having used the Clavis Mathematicae, as a textbook whilst teaching at he university he made several suggestions for improving the book and persuaded Oughtred to publish a third edition in 1652

William Oughtred by Wenceslas Hollar 1646 Source: Wikimedia Commons

William Oughtred
by Wenceslas Hollar 1646
Source: Wikimedia Commons

In 1648 John Greaves, one of the first English translators of Arabic and Persian scientific texts into Latin, also became a victim of a Puritan purge and was evicted from the Savilian Chair for Astronomy at Oxford. Greaves recommended Ward as his successor and in 1649, having overcame his scruples, Ward took the oath to the English Commonwealth and was appointed Savilian Professor.

yooniqimages_102046418

These episodes, Wards expulsion from Sidney-Sussex and Greave’s from Oxford, serve to remind us that much of the scientific investigations that took place in the Early Modern Period, and which led to the creation of modern science, did so in the midst of the many bitter and very destructive religious wars that raged throughout Europe during this period. The scholars who carried out those investigations did not remain unscathed by these disturbances and careers were often deeply affected by them. The most notable example being, of course Johannes Kepler, who was tossed around by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation like a leaf in a storm. Anyone attempting to write a history of the science of this period has to, in my opinion, take these external vicissitudes into account; a history that does not do so is only a half history.

It was in his role as Savilian Professor that Ward made his greatest contribution to the development of the new heliocentric astronomy in an academic dispute with the French astronomer and mathematician Ismaël Boulliau (1605–1694).

Ismaël Boulliau  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Ismaël Boulliau
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Boulliau was an early supporter of the elliptical astronomy of Johannes Kepler, who however rejected much of Kepler’s ideas. In 1645 he published his own theories based on Kepler’s work in his Astronomia philolaïca. This was the first major work by another astronomer that incorporated Kepler’s elliptical astronomy. Ward another Keplerian wrote his own work In Ismaelis Bullialdi Astronomiæ Philolaicæ Fundamenta Inquisitio Brevis, which heavily criticised Boulliau’s theories and present his own, in his opinion superior, interpretations of Kepler’s ideas. He followed this with another more extensive presentation of his theories in 1656, Astronomia Geometrica; ubi Methodus proponitur qua Primariorum Planetarum Astronomia sive Elliptica sive Circularis possit Geometrice absolve. Boulliau responded in 1657 in his Ismaelis Bullialdi Astronomiæ Philolaicæ Fundamenta clarius explicata et asserta, printed in his Exercitationes Geometricæ tres in which he acknowledged errors in his own work but also pointing out inaccuracies in Ward’s. In final analysis both Boulliau and Ward were wrong, and we don’t need to go into detail her, but their dispute drew the attention of other mathematicians and astronomers to Kepler’s work and thus played a major role in its final acceptance as the preferred model for astronomy in the latter part of the seventeenth century.

The worst popular model of the emergence of modern astronomy in the Early Modern Period sees the inspiring creation of heliocentric astronomy by Copernicus in his De revolutionibus in the sixteenth century, the doting of a few ‘I’s and crossing of a few ‘T’s by Galileo and Kepler in the early seventeenth century followed by the triumphant completion of the whole by Newton in his Principia in 1687. Even those who acknowledge that Kepler created something new with his elliptical astronomy still spring directly to Newton and the Principia. In fact many scholars contributed to the development of the ideas of Kepler and Galileo in the decades between them and Isaac Newton and if we are going to correctly understand how science evolves it is important to give weight to the work of those supposedly minor figures. The scientific debate between Boulliau and Ward is a good example of an episode in the history of astronomy that we ignore at the peril of falsifying the evolution of a disciple that we are trying to understand.

Ward continued to make career as an astronomer mathematician. He was awarded an Oxford M.A. on 23 October 1649 and became a fellow of Wadham College in 1650. The mathematician John Wilkins was warden of Wadham and the centre of a group of likeminded enthusiasts for the emerging new sciences that at times included Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke, Christopher Wren, John Wallis and many others. This became known as the Philosophical Society of Oxford, and they would go on to become one of the founding groups of the Royal Society in the early 1660s.

During his time at Oxford Ward together with his friend John Wallis, the Savilian Professor of Geometry, became involved in a bitter dispute with the philosopher Thomas Hobbes on the teaching of geometry at Oxford and the latter’s claim to have squared the circle; he hadn’t it’s impossible but the proof of that impossibility came first a couple of hundred years later.

Thomas Hobbes Artist unknown

Thomas Hobbes Artist unknown

Ward however was able to expose the errors in Hobbes’ geometrical deductions. In some circles Ward is better known for this dispute than for his contributions to astronomy.

John Wallis by Godfrey Kneller Source: Wikimedia Commons

John Wallis by Godfrey Kneller
Source: Wikimedia Commons

When the alchemist and cleric John Webster launched an attack on the curriculum of the English universities in his Academiarum Examen (1654) Ward joined forces with John Wilkins to write a defence refuting Webster’s arguments, Viniciae Acadmiarum, which also included refutations of other prominent critics of Oxford and Cambridge.

Greenhill, John; John Wilkins (1614-1672), Warden (1648-1659); Wadham College, University of Oxford;

Greenhill, John; John Wilkins (1614-1672), Warden (1648-1659); Wadham College, University of Oxford;

Ward’s career as an astronomer and mathematician was very successful and his work was known and respected throughout Europe, where he stood in contact with many of the leading exponents of his discipline. However, his career in academic politics was not so successful. He received a doctorate in theology (D.D.) from Oxford in 1654 and one from Cambridge in 1659. He was elected principle of Jesus College, Oxford in 1657 but Cromwell appointed somebody else promising Ward compensation, which he never delivered. In 1659 he was appointed president of Trinity College, Oxford but because he was not qualified for the office he was compelled to resign in 1660. This appears to have been the final straw and in 1660 he left academia, resigning his professorship to take up a career in the Church of England, with the active support of the recently restored Charles II.

He proceeded through a series of clerical positions culminating in the bishopric in Salisbury in 1667. He was appointed chancellor of the Order of the Garter in 1671. Ward turned down the offer of the bishopric of Durham remaining in Salisbury until his death 6 January 1689. He was a very active churchman, just as he had been a very active university professor, and enjoyed as good a reputation as a bishop as he had enjoyed as an astronomer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Christmas Trilogy 2016 Part 3: The English Keplerians

For any scientific theory to succeed, no matter how good or true it is; it needs people who support and propagate it. Disciples, so to speak, who are prepared to spread the gospel. Kepler’s astronomical theories, his three laws of planetary motion and everything that went with them, were no different from every other theory in this aspect; they needed a fan club. On the continent of Europe the reception of Kepler’s theories was initially lukewarm to say the least and it was not only Galileo, who did his best to ignore them. Therefore it is somewhat surprising that they found a group of enthusiastic supporters right from the beginning in England. Surprising because in general in the first half of the seventeenth century England lagged well behind the continent in astronomy, as in all things mathematical.

The first Englishmen to pick up on Kepler’s theories was the small group around Thomas Harriot, who did so immediately after the publication of the Astronomia nova in 1609.

Portrait often claimed to be Thomas Harriot (1602), which hangs in Oriel College, Oxford. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Portrait often claimed to be Thomas Harriot (1602), which hangs in Oriel College, Oxford. Source: Wikimedia Commons

The group included not only Harriot but also his lens grinder Christopher Tooke, the Cornish MP Sir William Lower (c.1570–1615) and his Welsh neighbour John Prydderch (or Protheroe). Lower had long been an astronomical pupil of Harriot’s and had in turn introduced his neighbour Prydderch to the science.

The cartoon of Lower and Prydderch on page 265 of Seryddiaeth a Seryddwyr By J.S. Evans. Lower looks through a telescope while Prydderch holds a cross-staff. The cartoon had been used earlier by Arthur Mee in his book The Story of the Telescope in 1909. The artist was J. M. Staniforth, the artist-in-chief of the Western Mail newspaper.

The cartoon of Lower and Prydderch on page 265 of Seryddiaeth a Seryddwyr By J.S. Evans. Lower looks through a telescope while Prydderch holds a cross-staff. The cartoon had been used earlier by Arthur Mee in his book The Story of the Telescope in 1909. The artist was J. M. Staniforth, the artist-in-chief of the Western Mail newspaper.

This group was one of the very earliest astronomical telescopic observing teams, exchanging information and comparing observations already in 1609/10. In 1610 they were enthusiastically reading Astronomia nova and discussing the new elliptical astronomy. It was Lower, who had carefully observed Halley’s comet in 1607 (pre-telescope) together with Harriot, who first suggested that the orbits of comets would also be ellipses. Kepler still thought that comets move in straight lines. The Harriot group did not publish their active support of the Keplerian elliptical astronomy but Harriot was well networked within the mathematical communities of both England and the Continent. He had even earlier had a fairly substantial correspondence with Kepler on the topic of atmospheric refraction. It is a fairly safe assumption that Harriot’s and Lower’s support of Kepler’s theories was known to other contemporary English mathematical practitioners.

Our next group of English Keplerians is that initiated by the astronomical prodigy Jeremiah Horrocks (1618–1641). Horrocks was a self-taught astronomer who stumbled across Kepler’s theories, whilst on the search for reliable astronomical tables. He quickly established that Kepler’s Rudolphine Tables were superior to other available tables and soon became a disciple of Kepler’s elliptical astronomy. Horrocks passed on his enthusiasm for Kepler’s theories to his astronomical helpmate William Crabtree (1610–1644). In turn Crabtree seems to have been responsible for converting another young autodidactic astronomer William Gascoigne (1612–1644) to the Keplerian astronomical gospel. Crabtree referred to this little group as Nos Keplari. Horrocks contributed to the development of Keplerian astronomy with an elliptical model of the Moon’s orbit, something that Kepler had not achieved. This model was the one that would eventually make its way into Newton’s Principia. He also corrected and extended the Rudolphine Tables enabling Horrocks and Crabtree to become, famously, the first people ever to observe a transit of Venus.

opera_posthuma

Like Harriot’s group, Nos Keplari published little but they were collectively even better networked than Harriot. Horrocks had been at Oxford Emmanual College Cambridge with John Wallis and it was Wallis, a convinced nationalist, who propagated Horrocks’ posthumous astronomical reputation against foreign rivals, as he also did in the question of algebra for Harriot. Both Gascoigne and Crabtree had connections to the Towneley family, landed gentry who took a strong interest in the emerging modern science of the period. Later the Towneley’s who had connections to the Royal Society ensured that the work of Nos Keplari was not lost and forgotten, bringing it, amongst other things, to the attention of a young John Flamsteed, who would later become the first Astronomer Royal. . Gascoigne had connections to William Cavendish, the later Duke of Newcastle, under whose command he served at the battle of Marston Moor, where he died. William, his brother Charles and his wife Margaret were all enthusiastic supporters of the new sciences and important members of the English scientific and philosophical community. Gascoigne also corresponded with William Oughtred who served as private mathematics tutor to many leading members of the burgeoning English mathematical community. It is to two of Oughtred’s students that we now turn

William Oughtred by Wenceslas Hollar 1646

William Oughtred
by Wenceslas Hollar 1646

Seth Ward (1617–1689) studied at Oxford Cambridge University from 1636 to 1640 when he became a fellow of Sidney Sussex College.

Greenhill, John; Seth Ward (1617-1689), Savilian Professor of Astronomy, Oxford (1649-1660) Source: Wikimedia Commons

Greenhill, John; Seth Ward (1617-1689), Savilian Professor of Astronomy, Oxford (1649-1660)
Source: Wikimedia Commons

In the same year he took instruction in mathematics from William Oughtred. In 1649 he became Savilian Professor of Astronomy at Oxford University the same year that John Wallis was appointed Savilian Professor of Mathematics. Whilst serving as Savilian Professor, Ward became embroiled in a dispute about Keplerian astronomy with the French astronomer and mathematician Ismaël Boulliau.

Ismaël Boulliau  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Ismaël Boulliau
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Boulliau was an early and strong defender of Keplerian elliptical astronomy, who however rejected Kepler’s attempts to create a physical explanation of planetary orbits. Boulliau published his Keplerian theories in his Astronomia philoaïca in 1645. Ward attacked Boulliau’s model in his In Ismaelis Bullialdi astro-nomiae philolaicae fundamenta inquisitio brevis from 1653, presenting his own model for Kepler’s planetary laws. Boulliau responded to Ward’s attack in his De lineis spiralibus from 1657. Ward had amplified his own views in his Astronomia geometrica from 1656. This public exchange between two heavyweight champions of the elliptical astronomy did much to raise the general awareness of Kepler’s work in England. It has been suggested that the dispute was instrumental in bringing Newton’s attention to Kepler’s ideas, a claim that is however disputed by historians.

Ward went on to make a successful career in the Church of England, eventually becoming Bishop of Salisbury his successor, as Savilian Professor of Astronomy was another one of Oughtred’s student, Christopher Wren (1632–1723).

Christopher Wren by Godfrey Keller 1711  Source: Wikimedia Commons

Christopher Wren by Godfrey Keller 1711
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Wren is of course much better known as the foremost English architect of the seventeenth-century but started out as mathematician and astronomer. Wren studied at Wadham College Oxford from 1650 to 1653, where he was part of the circle of scientifically interested scholars centred on John Wilkins (1614–1672), the highly influential early supporter of heliocentric astronomy. The Wilkins group included at various times Seth Ward, John Wallis, Robert Boyle, William Petty and Robert Hooke amongst others and would go on to become one of the groups that founded the Royal Society. Wren was a protégé of Sir Charles Scarborough, a student of William Harvey who later became a famous physician in his own right; Scarborough had been a fellow student of Ward’s and was another student of Oughtred’s. Wren was appointed Gresham Professor of Astronomy and it was following his lectures at Gresham College that the meetings took place that would develop into the Royal Society. As already noted Wren then went on to succeed Ward as Savilian Professor for astronomy in 1661, a post that he resigned in 1673 when his work as Surveyor of the King’s Works (a post he took on in 1669), rebuilding London following the Great Fire of 1666, became too demanding. Wren enjoyed a good reputation as a mathematician and astronomer and like Ward was a convinced Keplerian.

Our final English Keplerian is Nicolaus Mercator (1620–1687), who was not English at all but German, but who lived in London from 1658 to 1682 teaching mathematics.

Nicolaus Mercator © 1996-2007 Eric W. Weisstein

Nicolaus Mercator
© 1996-2007 Eric W. Weisstein

In his first years in England Mercator corresponded with Boulliau on the subject of Horrock’s Transit of Venus observations. Mercator stood in contact with the leading English mathematicians, including Oughtred, John Pell and John Collins and in 1664 he published a defence of Keplerian astronomy Hypothesis astronomica nova. Mercator’s work contained an acceptable mathematical proof of Kepler’s second law, the area law, which had been a bone of contention ever since Kepler published it in 1609; Kepler’s own proof being highly debateable, to put it mildly. Mercator continued his defence of Kepler in his Institutiones astronomicae in 1676. It was probably through Mercator’s works, rather than Ward’s, that Newton became acquainted with Kepler’s astronomy. We still have Newton’s annotated copy of the latter work. Newton and Mercator were acquainted and corresponded with each other.

As I hope to have shown there was a strong continuing interest in England in Keplerian astronomy from its very beginnings in 1609 through to the 1660s when it had become de facto the astronomical model of choice in English scientific circles. As I stated at the outset, to become accepted a new scientific theory has to find supporters who are prepared to champion it against its critics. Kepler’s elliptical astronomy certainly found those supporters in England’s green and pleasant lands.

 

 

 

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Christmas Trilogy 2016 Part 2: What a difference an engine makes

Charles Babbage is credited with having devised the first ever special-purpose mechanical computer as well as the first ever general-purpose mechanical computer. The first claim seems rather dubious in an age where there is general agreement that the Antikythera mechanism is some sort of analogue computer. However, Babbage did indeed conceive and design the Difference Engine, a special purpose mechanical computer, in the first half of the nineteenth century. But what is a Difference Engine and why “Difference”?

Both Babbage and John Herschel were deeply interested in mathematical tables – trigonometrical tables, logarithmic tables – when they were still students and Babbage started collecting as many different editions of such tables as he could find. His main object was to check them for mistakes. Such mathematical tables were essential for navigation and errors in the figures could lead to serious navigation error for the users. Today if I want to know the natural logarithm of a number, let’s take 23.483 for example, I just tip it into my pocket calculator, which cost me all of €18, and I instantly get an answer to nine decimal places, 3.156276755. In Babbage’s day one would have to look the answer up in a table each value of which had been arduously calculated by hand. The risk that those calculations contained errors was very high indeed.

Babbage reasoned that it should be possible to devise a machine that could carryout those arduous calculations free of error and if it included a printer, to print out the calculated answer avoiding printing errors as well. The result of this stream of thought was his Difference Engine but why Difference?

The London Science Museum's reconstruction of Difference Engine No. 2 Source: Wikimedia Commons

The London Science Museum’s reconstruction of Difference Engine No. 2
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Babbage needed to keep his machine as simple as possible, which meant that the simplest solution would be a machine that could calculate all the necessary tables with variations on one algorithm, where an algorithm is just a step-by-step recipe to solve a mathematical problem. However, he needed to calculate logarithms, sines, cosines and tangents, did such an algorithm exist. Yes it did and it had been discovered by Isaac Newton and known as the method of finite differences.

The method of finite differences describes a property shared by all polynomials. If it has been a while since you did any mathematics, polynomials are mathematical expressions of the type x2+5x-3 or 7x5-3x3+2x2-3x+6 or x2-2 etc, etc. If you tabulate the values of a given polynomial for x=0, x=1, x=2, x=3 and so on then subtract the first value from the second, the second from the third and so on you get a new column of numbers. Repeating the process with this column produces yet another column and so on. At some point in the process you end up with a column that is filled with a numerical constant. Confused? OK look at the table below!

 

x x3-3x2+6 xn+1-xn diff(1)n+1 –diff(1)n diff(2)n+1 – diff(2)n
0 6 -2 0 6
1 4 -2 6 6
2 2 4 12 6
3 6 16 18
4 22 34
5 56
6

 

As you can see this particular polynomial bottoms out, so to speak, with as constant of 6. If we now go back into the right hand column and enter a new 6 in the first free line then add this to its immediate left hand neighbour repeating this process across the table we arrive at the polynomial column with the next value for the polynomial. See below:

 

x x3-3x2+6 xn+1-xn diff(1)n+1 –diff(1)n diff(2)n+1 – diff(2)n
0 6 -2 0 6
1 4 -2 6 6
2 2 4 12 6
3 6 16 18 6
4 22 34
5 56
6

 

x x3-3x2+6 xn+1-xn diff(1)n+1 –diff(1)n diff(2)n+1 – diff(2)n
0 6 -2 0 6
1 4 -2 6 6
2 2 4 12 6
3 6 16 18 6
4 22 34 24
5 56
6

 

x x3-3x2+6 xn+1-xn diff(1)n+1 –diff(1)n diff(2)n+1 – diff(2)n
0 6 -2 0 6
1 4 -2 6 6
2 2 4 12 6
3 6 16 18 6
4 22 34 24
5 56 58
6

 

x x3-3x2+6 xn+1-xn diff(1)n+1 –diff(1)n diff(2)n+1 – diff(2)n
0 6 -2 0 6
1 4 -2 6 6
2 2 4 12 6
3 6 16 18 6
4 22 34 24
5 56 58
6 114

This means that if we set up our table and calculate enough values to determine the difference constant then we can by a process of simple addition calculate all further values of the polynomial. This is exactly what Babbage designed his difference engine to do.

If you’ve been paying attention you might notice that the method of finite differences applies to polynomials and Babbage wished to calculate were logarithmic and trigonometrical functions. This is however not a serious problem, through the use of other bits of higher mathematics, which we don’t need to go into here, it is possible to represent both logarithmic and trigonometrical functions as polynomials. There are some problems involved with using the method of finite differences with these polynomials but these are surmountable and Babbage was a good enough mathematician to cope with these difficulties.

Babbage now had a concept and a plan to realise it, all he now needed was the finances to put his plan into action. This was not a problem. Great Britain was a world power with a large empire and the British Government was more than ready to cough up the readies for a scheme to provide reliable mathematical tables for navigation for the Royal Navy and Merchant Marine that serviced, controlled and defended that empire. In total over a period of about ten years the Government provided Babbage with about £17, 000, literally a fortune in the early nineteen hundreds. What did they get for their money, in the end nothing!

Why didn’t Babbage deliver the Difference Engine? There is a widespread myth that Babbage’s computer couldn’t be built with the technology available in the first half of the nineteenth century. This is simply not true, as I said a myth. Several modules of the Difference Engine were built and functioned perfectly. Babbage himself had one, which he would demonstrate at his scientific soirées, amongst other things to demonstrate his theory of miracles.

The Difference Engine model used by Babbage for his demonstrations of his miracle theory Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Difference Engine model used by Babbage for his demonstrations of his miracle theory
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Other Difference Engines modules were exhibited and demonstrated at the Great Exhibition in Crystal Palace. So why didn’t Babbage finish building the Difference Engine and deliver it up to the British Government? Babbage was not an easy man, argumentative and prone to bitter disputes. He became embroiled in one such dispute with Joseph Clement, the engineer who was actually building the Difference Engine, about ownership of and rights to the tools developed to construct the engine and various already constructed elements. Joseph Clement won the dispute and decamped together with said tools and elements. By now Babbage was consumed with a passion for his new computing vision, the general purpose Analytical Engine. He now abandoned the Difference Engine and tried to convince the government to instead finance the, in his opinion, far superior Analytical Engine. Having sunk a fortune into the Difference Engine and receiving nothing in return, the government, not surprisingly, demurred. The much hyped Ada Lovelace Memoire on the Analytical Engine was just one of Babbage’s attempts to advertise his scheme and attract financing.

However, the story of the Difference Engine didn’t end there. Using knowledge that he had won through his work on the Analytical Engine, Babbage produced plans for an improved, simplified Difference Engine 2 at the beginning of the 1850s.

Per Georg Schutz Source: Wikimedia Commons

Per Georg Schutz
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The Swedish engineer Per Georg Scheutz, who had already been designing and building mechanical calculators, began to manufacture difference engines based on Babbage’s plans for the Difference Engine 2 in 1855. He even sold one to the British Government.

Scheutz Difference Engine No. 2. (1859) Maschine im Science Museum, London Source: Wikimedia Commons

Scheutz Difference Engine No. 2. (1859) Maschine im Science Museum, London
Source: Wikimedia Commons

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