Search Results for: one day later

One day later

In my last post I commented on the priority disputes that Galileo carried out with other users of the telescope in the early years of telescopic astronomy. Some of his most vitriolic comments were launched from the pages of his … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Astrology, History of Astronomy, Local Heroes

The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time

The title of this post is the subtitle of Dava Sobel’s Longitude, her mega bestselling account of the life and work of the eighteenth-century clock maker John Harrison; probably the biggest selling popular #histSTM book of all time. I’m quite … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Navigation, History of Technology, Myths of Science

“I went on holiday and I haven’t gone back home yet”

Today is the eighth anniversary of the founding of The Renaissance Mathematicus and, as on a couple of similar occasions in the past, I have decided to regale you with something biographical[1]. This is quite literally a tale of sex … Continue reading

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A birthday amongst the stars

Readers will probably be aware that as well as writing this blog I also hold, on a more or less regular basis, semi-popular, public lectures on the history of science. These lectures are as diverse as this blog and have … Continue reading

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Filed under Autobiographical, History of Astronomy, History of Optics, History of science, Uncategorized

Friends – #GesnerDay

It is very common in the history of science, particularly in popular presentations, to describe the life and work of scientists as if they existed in some sort of bubble cut off from the rest of humanity. This type of … Continue reading

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The widespread and persistent myth that it is easier to multiply and divide with Hindu-Arabic numerals than with Roman ones.

Last Sunday the eminent British historian of the twentieth century, Richard Evans, tweeted the following: Let’s remember we use Arabic numerals – 1, 2, 3 etc. Try dividing MCMLXVI by XXXIX ­– Sir Richard Evans (@Richard Evans36) There was no … Continue reading

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Just another day

A very large number of my Internet acquaintances along with both the English and German language media that I have access to are indulging in their yearly hysteria because today is New Year’s Eve and tomorrow is New Year’s Day, … Continue reading

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Someone is Wrong on the Internet.

Many of the readers of this blog will probably recognise the title of this post, as the punch line to one of the best ever xkcd cartoons. Regular readers will also know that the Renaissance Mathematicus cannot resist stamping on … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Astronomy, History of Cartography, History of science, Myths of Science

A very similar luminous lustre appears when one observes a burning candle from a great distance through a translucent piece of horn.

On 15 December 1612 (os) Simon Marius, Court Mathematicus in Ansbach, became the first astronomer to record a telescopic observation of the Andromeda Nebula. The importance of this observation was that whereas other known nebulae such as the Orion Nebula, … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Astronomy, History of science, Local Heroes, Renaissance Science

Jesuit Day

Adam Richter (@AdamDRichter) of the Wallifaction Blog (he researches John Wallis) tells me that the Society of Jesus, known colloquially as the Jesuits, was officially recognised by Pope Paul III on 27th September 1540. He gives a short list of … Continue reading

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Filed under History of Astronomy, History of science, Myths of Science, Renaissance Science