A multi-functional book for a multi-functional instrument

Probably the most talked about astronomical instrument in recent years is the so-called Antikythera Mechanism, several corroded chunks of bronze gear work found in the sea of the coast of the Greek island of Antikythera at the end of the nineteenth century.

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The Antikythera mechanism (Fragment A – front); visible is the largest gear in the mechanism, approximately 140 millimetres (5.5 in) in diameter Source: Wikimedia Commons

Historian of ancient astronomy, Alexander Jones, who was a member of one of the teams investigating and interpreting the mechanism, has now written a book about it, A Portable Cosmos.[1]

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I say that he has written a book but in fact it is really several books in one. The first two chapters deal with the story of the original discovery and recovery of the mechanism. They also sketch the history of the succession of investigations and interpretations of the mechanism that have taken place between its discovery and the present. The longest section of the book deals with a detailed description of the external aspects of the mechanism, its dials, scales and pointers. The penultimate chapter is an examination of the physical aspects of the mechanism, its gears and gear shafts. The final chapter, an afterword, is titled The Meaning of the Mechanism. For me, the most fascinating element of the book is that Jones in his explanations of the functions of the dials and pointers delivers up a comprehensive introduction to the histories of astronomy, astrology and cosmology of ancient Babylon and Greece, in fact I would rate it as the best such introduction that I have ever read.

Despite his very obviously high level command of the material Jones does not baffle with science but writes in a light and very accessible style and I for one found the book highly readable. Of interest is the fact that because large parts of the mechanism are missing and what is there is highly damaged there is not a general agreement under the experts, who have worked on the mechanism, about how to interpret the function or purpose of numerous aspects of it. Jones doesn’t just express his own well-informed and well-reasoned explanations but draws his readers’ attention to alternative suggestions and interpretations, explaining why he prefers his own chosen one. Having said this archaeoastronomer Doris Vickers, who recommended the book to me suggested also consulting the official Greek Antikythera Mechanism Research Project website, which has more information and other viewpoints to those of Jones.

The book has a very useful glossary of technical terms, endnotes (regular readers already know my views on endnotes contra footnotes), a comprehensive bibliography so you can read up on those interpretations that deviate from Jones’ and a good index.

To quote a cliché, if you only read one book on the Antikythera Mechanism, then it really should be this one. It kept me occupied and entertained during my recent four days in hospital and proved to be an excellent companion for that period and I would whole heartedly recommended for happier circumstances as well.

[1] Alexander Jones, A Portable Cosmos: Revealing the Antikythera Mechanism, Scientific Wonder of the Ancient World, OUP, Oxford, 2007

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Filed under Book Reviews, History of Astrology, History of Astronomy, History of Technology, Uncategorized

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