All at sea

As I’ve said more than once in the past, mathematics as a discipline as we know it today didn’t exist in the Early Modern Period. Mathematics, astronomy, astrology, geography, cartography, navigation, hydrography, surveying, instrument design and construction, and horology were all facets or sub-disciplines of a sort of mega-discipline that was the stomping ground of the working mathematicus, whether inside or outside the university. The making of sea charts – or to give it its technical name, hydrography – combines mathematics, geography, cartography, astronomy, surveying, and the use of instruments so I am always happy to add a new volume on the history of sea charts to my collection of books on cartography and hydrography.

I recently acquired the “revised and updated” reissue of Peter Whitfield’s Charting the Oceans, a British Library publication.

The original edition from 1996 carried the subtitle Ten Centuries of Maritime Maps (missing from the new edition) and this is what Whitfield delivers in his superb tome. The book has four sections: Navigation before Charts, The Sea-Chart and the Age of Exploration, Sea-Charts in Europe’s Maritime Age and War, Empire and Technology: The Last 200 years. As can be seen from these section titles Whitfield not only deals with the details of the hydrography and the charts produced but defines the driving forces behind the cartographic developments: explorations, trade, war and colonisation. This makes the book to a valuable all round introduction of the subject highly recommended to anybody looking for a general overview of the topic.

However, what really makes this book very special is the illustrations.

The Nile Delta, c. 1540, from Piri Re’is Kitab-i Bahriye
Charting the Oceans page 90

A large format volume, more than fifty per cent of the pages are adorned with amazing reproductions of the historical charts that Whitfield describes in his text.

Willem van de Velde II, Dutch Ships in a Calm, c. 1665
Charting the Oceans page 132

Beautifully photographed and expertly printed the illustrations make this a book to treasure. Although not an academic text, in the strict sense, there is a short bibliography for those, whose appetites wetted, wish to delve deeper into the subject and an excellent index. Given the quality of the presentation the official British Library shop price of £14.99 is ridiculously low and a real bargain. If you love maps all I can say is buy this book.

Title page to the English edition of Lucas Janszoon Waghenaer’s Spiegheel der Zeevaert, 1588
Charting the Oceans page 109

The A Very Short Introduction series of books published by the Oxford University Press is a really excellent undertaking. Very small format 11×17 and a bit cm, they are somewhere between 100 and 150 pages long and provide a concise introduction to a single topic. One thing that distinguishes them is the quality of the authors that OUP commissions to write them; they really are experts in their field. The Galileo volume, for example, is authored by Stillman Drake, one of the great Galileo experts, and The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction was written by Mr Periodic Table himself, Eric Scerri. So when Navigation: A Very Short Introduction appeared recently I couldn’t resist. Especially, as it is authored by Jim Bennett a man who probably knows more about the topic then almost anybody else on the surface of the planet.

Mr Bennett does not disappoint, in a scant 135-small-format-pages he delivers a very comprehensive introduction to the history of navigation. He carefully explains all of the principal developments down the centuries and does not shy away from explaining the intricate mathematical and astronomical details of various forms of navigation.

Navigation: A Very Short Introduction page 50

The book contains a very useful seven page Glossary of Terms, a short but very useful annotated bibliography, which includes the first edition of Whitfield’s excellent tome, and a comprehensive index. One aspect of the annotated bibliography that particularly appealed to me was his comments on Dava Sobel’s Longitude; he writes:

“[It] …has the disadvantage of being very one-sided despite the more scrupulous work found in in earlier books such as Rupert T. Gould, The Marine Chronometer: Its History and Development (London, Holland Press, 1960); and Humphrey Quill, John Harrison: The Man Who Found Longitude (London, John Baker, 1966)”

I have read both of these books earlier and can warmly recommend them. He then recommends Derek Howse, Greenwich Time and the Discovery of Longitude (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1980), which sits on my bookshelf, and Derek Howse, Nevil Maskelyne: The Seaman’s Astronomer, (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1989), which I haven’t read. However it was his closing comment that I found most interesting:

“A welcome recent corrective is Richard Dunn and Rebekah Higgitt, Ships, Clocks, and Stars: The Quest for Longitude (Collins: Glasgow, 2014)”. A judgement with which, regular readers of this blog will already know, I heartily concur.

The flyleaf of the Navigation volume contains the following quote:

‘a thoroughly good idea. Snappy, small-format…stylish design…perfect to pop into your pocket for spare moments’ – Lisa Jardine, The Times

Another judgement with which I heartily concur. Although square centimetre for square centimetre considerably more expensive than Whitfield’s book the Bennett navigation volume is still cheap enough (official OUP price £7.99) not to break the household budget. For those wishing to learn more about the history of navigation and the closely related mapping of the seas I can only recommend that they acquire both of these excellent publications.

 

 

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4 Comments

Filed under History of Cartography, History of Mathematics, History of Navigation

4 responses to “All at sea

  1. elcste

    The new version of _Charting the Oceans_ isn’t out until 1 Nov in the US, but the BL’s price with delivery is only a couple dollars more than Amazon’s price without. Ordered and looking forward to it!

  2. Huenemann

    I share your love of the Very Short series. I reviewed a manuscript for Oxford, and for payment, took in about 20 of these little volumes – really delightful.

  3. Eugene Callahan

    If you got the do-re, I got the mi
    And I got a notion we’re all at sea

  4. Pingback: Whewell’s Gazette: Year 3, Vol. #47 | Whewell's Ghost

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