One line to rule them all

A standard concept in the modern politico-military terminology is that of mission creep. This describes the, in the last sixty or seventy years often observed, phenomenon of a military intervention by a dominant power that starts with a so-called police action with a couple of hundred combatants and then within a couple of years grows to a full scale military operation involving thousands of troops and the expenditure of sums of money with an eye watering large number of zeros at the end. Famous examples of mission creep were the Americans in Viet Nam and the Russians in Afghanistan. In fact since the Second World War the American have become world champions in mission creep.

As a historian I, and I strongly suspect virtually all of my historian colleagues, experience a form of mission creep in every field of study to which I turn my attention. In fact the progress of my entire career as a historian of science has been one massive example of mission creep. It all started, at the age of sixteen, when I first learned that Isaac Newton was the (co)discoverer/inventor[1] of the calculus that I so loved at school. (Yes, I know that makes me sound a little bit strange but there’s no accounting for taste). This of course set me off on the trail of the whole history of mathematics, but that is not what I want to talk about here; let us stick with Newton. At some point I started to wonder why Newton, whom I saw as very much the theoretical mathematician and physicist, should have invented a telescope. This set me on the trail of the entire history of the telescope and because the telescope is an optical instrument, with time, the history of optics, not just in the early modern period but backwards through time into the European Middle Ages, the Islamic Empire and Antiquity. Of course Newton is most well known as physicist and astronomer and at some point I started investigating the pre-history of his work in astronomy. This eventually led me back to the Renaissance astronomers, not just Copernicus but all those whose work provided the foundations for Copernicus’s own work.

At some point it became very clear to me that to talk of Renaissance astronomers was in some sense a misnomer because those who pursued the study of astronomy in this time did so within a discipline that encompassed not just astronomy but also astrology, cartography (with a large chunk of geography and history in the mix), navigation, surveying, geodesy as well as the mathematical knowledge necessary to do all of these things. These were not separate disciplines as we see them now but different facets of one discipline. Over the years my studies have expanded to cover all of these facets and one into which I have delved very deeply is the history of cartography with the associated history of surveying. All of this is a rather longwinded explanation of why I have been reading Charles Withers’ new book Zero Degrees[2]

 

This book describes the history of how the Greenwich Meridian became the Prime Meridian.

A brief explanation for those who are not really clear what a meridian is; a meridian (or line of longitude) is any ‘straight’ line on the globe of the of the earth connecting the North Pole with the South Pole, where here straight means taking the shortest path between the two poles, as a meridian is by nature curved because it lies on the surface of the globe. Meridians are by their very nature arbitrary, abstract and non-real. We can chose to put a meridian wherever we like, they are an artificial construct and not naturally given. The Prime Meridian is a singular, unique, universally accepted meridian from which all other meridians (lines of longitude) are measured. The recognition of the necessity for a Prime Meridian is a fairly recent one in human history and Withers’ book deals with the history of the period between that recognition in the Early Modern Period to the realisation of a Prime Meridian at the beginning of the twentieth century.

The first thing that Withers made me aware of is that a meridian is not a singular object but one that has at least four separate functions and at least two different realisations. Meridians are used for navigation, for time determination, for cartography and for astronomy. The latter is because astronomers project our latitude and longitude coordinate system out into space in order to map the heavens. Nothing says that one has to use the same meridians for each of these activities and for much of the period of history covered by Withers people didn’t.

On the realisation of meridians Withers distinguishes two geographical and observed. The majority of meridians in use before the late seventeenth century were geographical. What does this mean? It meant that somebody simply said that they make their measurements or calculations from an imaginary line, the meridian, through some given geographical point on the surface of the earth. Ptolemaeus to whom we own our longitude and latitude coordinate system, although he had predecessors in antiquity, used the Azores as his zero meridian although he didn’t know with any real accuracy where exactly the Azores lay. Also the Azores is a scattered island group and he doesn’t specify exactly where within this island group his zero meridian ran. We have a lovely example of the confusion caused by this inaccuracy. On 4 May 1493 Pope Alexander VI issued the papal bull Inter caetera, which granted the Crowns of Castile and Aragon all the lands to the west and south of a meridian 100 leagues and south of the Azores or the Cape Verde islands.

This led to a whole series of treaties and papal bulls carving up the globe between Spain (Castile and Aragon) and Portugal. The 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas moved the line to a meridian 370 leagues west of the Portuguese Cape Verde islands now explicitly giving Portugal all new discoveries east of this meridian. I’m not going to go into all the gory details but this led to all sorts of problems because nobody actually knew where exactly this meridian or its anti-meridian on the other side of the globe lay. Ownership disputes in the Pacific between Spain and Portugal were pre-programmed. These are classical examples of geographical meridians.

The Cantino planisphere of 1502 shows the line of the Treaty of Tordesillas.
Source: Wikimedia Commons

The first observed meridian in the Early Modern Period was the Paris Meridian surveyed by Jean-Félix Picard in the 1660s. Such meridians are called observed because their exact position on the globe is determined astronomically using a transit telescope.

In the Early Modern Period there was no consensus as to which meridian should be used for which purpose and on the whole each country used its own zero meridian. I fact it was not unusual for several different zero meridians to be used for different purposes or even the same purpose, with one country. For geographers, cartographers and navigators crossing borders chaos ruled. The awareness that a single Prime Meridian would be beneficial for all already existed in the seventeenth century but it wasn’t until the nineteenth century that serious moves were made to solve the problem.

The discussion were long and very complicated and involved scientific, political and pragmatic considerations, which often clashed with each other. On the political level nationalism, of course, raised its ugly head. Surprisingly, at least for me, there was also a very heated discussion as to whether the Prime Meridian should be a geographical or an observed meridian. I personally can discern no reasons in favour of a geographical Prime Meridian but various participants in the discussions could. Another problem was one or more Prime Meridians? Separate ones for cartography, navigation, astronomy and time determination.

Withers deals with all of these topics in great detail and very lucidly in his excellent summery of all of the discussions leading up to the International Meridian Conference in Washington in 1884, which forms the climax of his book.

The delegates to the International Meridian Conference in Washington in 1884
Source: Wikimedia Commons

This is a truly fascinating piece of the history of science and in Withers it has found a more than worthy narrator and I recommend his book whole-heartedly for anybody who might be interested in the topic. Very important is his penultimate chapter Washington’s Afterlife. Every year in October people in the Internet announce that on this day in 1884 (I can’t be bothered to look up the exact date) the Greenwich Meridian became the world’s Prime Meridian and every year my #histsci soul sisterTM Rebekah ‘Becky’ Higgitt (who played a significant role in the genesis of Withers’ book, as can be read in the acknowledgements) announces no it didn’t, the resolutions reached in Washington were non-binding. In fact the acceptance of Greenwich as the Prime Meridian took quite some time after the Washington Conference, some even accepting it initial only for some but not all the four functions sketched above. France, whose Paris Meridian was the main contender against Greenwich, only finally accepted Greenwich as the Prime Meridian in 1912.

I do have a couple of minor quibbles about Withers’ book. In the preface he outlines the structure of the book saying what takes place in each section. He repeats this in greater detail in the introduction. Then he starts each chapter with a synopsis of the chapter’s contents, often repeating what he has already said in the introduction, and closes the chapter with a summary of its contents. It was for this reader a little bit too much repetition. My second quibble concerns the illustrations and tables of which there are a fairly large number in the book. These are all basically black and white but are in fact printed black on a sort of pastel grey. I assume that the book designer thinks this makes them somehow artistically more attractive but I personally found that it makes it more difficult to determine the details, particularly on the many maps that are reproduced. Whatever I wouldn’t let these rather personal minor points interfere with my genuine whole-hearted recommendation.

[1] Chose the word that best fits your personal philosophy of mathematics

[2] Charles W. J. Withers, Zero Degrees: Geographies of the Prime Meridian, Harvard University Press, Cambridge Massachusetts, London England, 2017

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under History of Cartography, History of Navigation, History of science

One response to “One line to rule them all

  1. Pingback: Whewell’s Gazette: Year 3, Vol. #38 | Whewell's Ghost

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s